Soft Skill: Hitting Your Deliverables

The Work Context The first thing to do is add some context the discussion and then we will start looking at the soft skills you need in the industry. Professional work  is made up of deliverable chains. Each person is creating work that will be used by another person for their work. Eventually out of the chains comes built the products we use everyday. This is fundamentally different than most academic work where homework is built up in parallel leading to a test. Because you are in ...
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What does it mean to be a professional?

The Soft Skills Problem One of the reasons why it is hard make the transition into professional work is that it is hard to characterize what it means to be a professional. What soft skills do professional hardware engineers have that makes them good at their work?   The general consensus has been that only way to learn the answer to this questions was through experience in a job. Even though this is true that you will learn this way it will only be after many false starts and mistakes, frustrat...
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Enrollment is open for the Spring Sessions!

The Engineer Accelerator is your entry point into the electrical engineer industry. This course will help answer all those questions you have about working with a manager, team dynamics, and the hardware development process. It will give you the chance to begin developing your professional network and a portfolio of completed projects. It will give you experience in producing professional level work at the pace required by industry. Engineering students, engineers job hunting, and engineers in f...
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March 2017 Session

Overview The goal of The Engineer Accelerator is to help new engineers integrate professional level skills into their work process and to show them how to hit a deliverable deadline through iterations of a 4 week development cycle. For more check out the program page Schedule and Locations The Professionalism Series will be held online Wednesdays from 6:00pm - 9:00pm. Join anywhere you have an internet connection. The Hardware Development Series will be an in-person lab Saturdays from 9:00...
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April 2017 Session

The session will run from April 5th  - May 5th The Hardware Development Series will be held at The Port Workspaces, 344 20th St Oakland 94612. It is two blocks from the 19th St BART station and is attached to the Kaiser Center Parking Garage. The Professionalism Series will be held online. Join anywhere you have an internet connection.
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May 2017 Session

The session will run from May 10th - June 9th The Hardware Development Series will be held at The Port Workspaces, 344 20th St Oakland 94612. It is two blocks from the 19th St BART station and is attached to the Kaiser Center Parking Garage. The Professionalism Series will be held online. Join anywhere you have an internet connection.
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Bridging the Gap in Professional Training

The Engineer Accelerator bridges the gap in training by going beyond a standard internship in three main areas It uses a curriculum that makes the implicit skills of a professional engineer explicit. These skills are distilled into a series of seminars and labs which give the students a framework to understand the subtle issues they will see in their career. When these issues come up they will be able to recognize them and respond accordingly. It uses an accelerated hardware development cy...
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What does it mean to be a professional?

When a new engineer enters the profession they come with the concepts that form the foundation of electrical engineering. This knowledge is necessary to be a professional but it is not sufficient. There is still a large gap between what a new engineer can do and what a professional engineer can do. In addition to knowing about current, voltage, frequency domain, etc. a professional engineer must know how to answer these questions: Do you know how to determine how long a task will take? ...
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The Professional Training Gap

All new electrical engineers need to learn professional skills to be successful. However, right now there is no consistent path for them to do so within the industry. This was not always the case. In the 1960s this training happened when you were hired for your first job. During this era engineers worked for a company for an extended amount of time, sometimes even their whole career so it was worth it to their employers to train their new hires in the specific skills needed for the industry. ...
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